Skip to main content

Mariana Baertl










As painters, we have minimal experience or knowledge of three dimensional work, particularly fibers. We saw fiber artist Mariana Baertl on social media and couldn't stop talking about the amazing color schemes and textures in her work! She utilizes her background in fashion and oceanic inspiration to create her work.

Mariana Baertl is the creator and artist behind Living Fibers. Baertl was born and raised in Lima, Peru's capital, surrounded by the countries' traditional handmade trades, especially textile work. She studied Fashion Design in Peru and later moved to Buenos Aires, Argentina to focus on Coolhunting, the study of "trends" and how it relates specifically to the fashion industry. Baertl then moved to Barcelona, Spain to begin her work in Haute Couture and pattern making. Her Haute Couture education taught her the level of patience and precision needed in creating handmade designs. Thereafter she earned a post graduate degree in Fashion Buisness management from Pompeu Fabra University, in Barcelona. Following graduation, she moved back to Lima, Peru to work as a fashion designer for a large retailer in Lima. While working with this company, she started experimenting with textures and textiles. Baertl soon found herself in love with the art and began making fiber art pieces whenever she could find the time. After several years as a fashion designer, she decided to make a change and immerse herself into the fiber world.

Her love of fibers is apparent; we asked Baertl to provide some insight into her work and process:

I get my inspiration from all things natural and organic, often influenced by what I call "natural clusters", which are various organic elements tightly arranged. An example of these natural clusters would be feathers, fossils of vegetation from a forest/dense tropical jungle. The ocean is also a major source of inspiration; from shapes waves create to the marine life like coral reefs, I find the ocean full of details.

You can find more of her inspiring work online at www.livingfibers.com and on Instagram @livingfibers

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Jo Illustrates!

Nancy Gruskin

Modern still life and figural paintings capturing the beauty in daily experiences, Nancy Gruskin's work creates a narrative with beautiful brushwork and use of color. We love the gestural quality and implied forms  of her work, adding a fresh perspective to classic still lives. 

Nancy Gruskin is a figurative and still life painter from Concord, Massachusetts.She received a B.A. in Art History and Studio Art from Connecticut College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Art History from Boston University.After teaching architectural history for several years, she now devotes herself to painting full-time.Her paintings emerge from everyday experiences and familiar views and are based on direct observation, photographs, invention and memory.Gruskin has shown her work across the United States and has an upcoming exhibition in Australia.She teaches painting at the Concord Center for the Visual Arts.
More of her work can be viewed at www.nancygruskin.com and on Instagram @nancygruskin.

Joanna Paola Honeyman

Vibrant hues in beautifully rendered still lives and figural work capturing often overlooked moments in daily life. The work of Joanna Paola Honeyman creates a narrative inviting the viewer to step back for a moment and observe joy and inspiration in every situation. Her paintings makes us want to pull up a chair at one of her dinners or tea/coffee breaks and take it easy for a moment. We hope you enjoy her work as much as we do!
Joanna Paola Honeyman is an artist living in Los Angeles. She has worked professionally as a graphic designer and has experimented with various art forms including calligraphy, jewelry making, photography, printmaking and costume design before finding her passion in oil painting.

Her work focuses on everyday themes, aiming to uplift the observer by taking a lighthearted approach to her subject matter. She explains:

Our daily lives are overwhelmed by many things competing for our attention. We are moving so fast that we often forget to acknowledge the wonderful t…